Teens@Graham, The Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance, Photo: Melissa Sherwood
Teens@Graham, The Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance, Photo: Melissa Sherwood
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"Entre Tú y Yo" by Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca

"Entre Tú y Yo" by Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca

Company:

Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca

Location:

The Connelly Theater

Dates:

Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 7:30pm
Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 7:30pm
Friday, March 22, 2019 - 8:00pm
Saturday, March 23, 2019 - 8:00pm
Sunday, March 24, 2019 - 3:00pm
Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 7:30pm
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 7:30pm
Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 7:30pm
Friday, March 29, 2019 - 8:00pm
Saturday, March 30, 2019 - 8:00pm
Sunday, March 31, 2019 - 3:00pm

Tickets:

https://ci.ovationtix.com/114/production/1006153

Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca

Noche Flamenca, the renowned company founded by Artistic Director Martín Santangelo and dancer Soledad Barrio,
continues, 25 years into its existence, both to mine the fundamentals of the genre and to stretch beyond tradition into other
canons and forms, as in the company’s recent, internationally acclaimed Antigona, an adaptation of Sophocles’ Antigone.
Noche Flamenca comes to New York City’s Connelly Theater with Entre Tú y Yo (Between You and Me), an evening-
length program of duets, solos, and ensemble works exploring the constraints imposed and the possibilities afforded by
human relationships.

Performances of Entre Tú y Yo take place March 8-31: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 7:30pm; Fridays and
Saturdays at 8pm; and Sundays at 3pm. Tickets, $20-50, can be purchased via Noche Flamenca’s website or by calling
866.811.4111. The Connelly Theater is located at 220 East 4th Street, New York, NY 10009.

Entre Tú y Yo includes the latest iteration of “La Ronde,” a work inspired by Max Ophüls’ 1950 film, and the dizzying
carousel of romantic and sexual relationships it presents, that Noche Flamenca has been developing for three years. The
“purest” form of flamenco includes a guitarist, a vocalist, and a solo dancer—but true to Noche Flamenca’s boundary-
pushing and emotionally probing style, in “La Ronde,” Santangelo uses a series of duets to explore love, hate, jealousy,
and death. The piece draws inspiration from Ingmar Bergman’s Persona, the pianist James Booker, the story of Cain and
Abel, Demeter & Persephone, and other sources, in addition to Ophüls.

Finally, Entre Tú y Yo includes Barrio’s signature, “Soleá,” which exemplifies the catharsis at the heart of flamenco. In it,
she displays the singular artistry Tobi Tobias attributed to her in ArtsJournal, where she wrote, “What woman could hold
a candle to Soledad Barrio? In modern dance, Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham. In ballet, maybe Nora Kaye, in her
Tudor roles. Certainly, no one we can go and see today has Barrio’s transformative power.”

In Entre Tú y Yo, Barrio is joined by some of Spain’s most celebrated flamenco artists, including dancers Antonio
Rodriguez, Marina Elana, Jasiel Nahim; musicians Eugenio Iglesias, Salva de Maria, and David Rodriguez; and
singers Manuel Gago, Emilio Florido, and Carmina Cortes.

The intimate, intuitive nature of Santangelo and Barrio’s partnership—as husband and wife, and as longtime
collaborators—makes their work with duets in flamenco all the more organic. Santangelo says, “Soledad and I have a
wonderful way of communicating. I approach ideas from an associative and experimental perspective. When I’m in
rehearsal, I’ll try everything and anything to get to it. Soledad is intuitive and corporally brilliant. She takes an idea and
realizes it physically. For our adaptation of Sophocles’ Antigone, I researched and developed for three years to be able to
fully express my vision, and in rehearsal, I tried many different approaches to each scene. Soledad read the play and right
away said, ‘I got it. I know who she is.’ We have two different ways of working, and we understand each other deeply. I
talk, and she listens; she dances, and I watch.”

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